REVIEW: No Time To Die (2021)

Daniel Craig as James Bond and Ana de Armas as Paloma in Cary Joji Fukunaga’s NO TIME TO DIE — Photo: Nicola Dove / Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios / Universal Pictures.

Directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga — Screenplay by Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, Cary Joji Fukunaga, and Phoebe Waller-Bridge.

When I rewatched Sam Mendes’ SPECTRE the other day, I was reminded of the fact that the previous film in the Bond-franchise was released all the way back in 2015. A lot has happened since then, so much so that you may have even forgotten about all of the behind-the-scenes drama that transpired long before No Time To Die became the first major film to be delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. After several rounds of rewrites, the shift in director, production, and the pandemic, the fifth and supposedly final film in the Daniel Craig-era of the James Bond-franchise has now finally been released. Thankfully, in spite of the real world drama that threatened to ruin it, this is actually a spy epic that is suitable as a true tribute to Daniel Craig’s bumpy but extraordinary time as the iconic agent. It isn’t the best film in the Craig-era, but it is a very memorable chapter in the franchise.

Continue reading “REVIEW: No Time To Die (2021)”

REVIEW: Skyfall (2012)

Daniel Craig as James Bond and Javier Bardem as Raoul Silva in SKYFALL — Photo: Columbia Pictures / Sony Pictures Releasing.

Directed by Sam Mendes — Screenplay by Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, and John Logan.

This week, I will watch and review No Time To Die, which is supposedly the final film in the Daniel Craig-era of the Bond-franchise. So, in anticipation of the aforementioned 25th Eon Bond-film, I decided to take a brief look back at one of the most popular Bond films ever made; the wildly successful Skyfall. As this film was released several years ago, I have decided to discuss the film with some spoiler details in this review, so make sure that you have actually seen Skyfall before you go any further.

Continue reading “REVIEW: Skyfall (2012)”

REVIEW: The Dig (2021)

Carey Mulligan, Archie Barnes, and Ralph Fiennes in ‘The Dig.’ — Photo: Larry Horricks / Netflix.

Directed by Simon Stone — Screenplay by Moira Buffini.

Back when I was just a very young teenager, my school had arranged for me to receive (what I guess you would call) on-job training for a week with a team of Danish archaeologists. I had had a natural interest in archaeology, and therefore I was thrilled when I got the chance to learn from them. Over the course of that week, I archived a lot of items, I spoke with the archaeologists for quite some time, I got an early look at a history museum’s recreation of a Viking ship (if memory serves), and I even got to take part in an actual excavation. For this reason, I had a particular interest in Simon Stone’s The Dig, a Netflix original film about a historic excavation in England in 1939, and I actually really enjoyed watching it and learning about Basil Brown and Edith Pretty. But I will say that this period drama is probably a little bit too slow for your average Netflix subscriber. Continue reading “REVIEW: The Dig (2021)”

Best of the 2010s: Top Ten Comedy Films

Paramount Pictures; Fox Searchlight Pictures.

Comedy isn’t black-and-white. The genre most associated with films like your average American comedy like, say, American Pie or some Judd Apatow film is much more than its stereotype. There are stylish and quirky comedies, absurd and dark comedies. Comedy films come in all shapes and sizes, and the Best of the 2010s-list highlights multiple different types in the genre. Continue reading “Best of the 2010s: Top Ten Comedy Films”

REVIEW: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part Two (2011)

Poster - Warner Bros.
Poster – Warner Bros.

The following is a spoiler-filled review of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part Two.

In 2004, The Lord of the Rings film series was recognized at the Academy Awards in a big way. The Return of the King was nominated for eleven Oscars, and it, somehow, managed to win every single award it was nominated for. That was a big deal. It was a big moment for the Oscars, the Tolkien films, and all genre films.

In 2011, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part Two was released. The Academy, however, chose not to recognize the Harry Potter film series in the same way. That is a shame. Because the Harry Potter film series actually ended on such a high note that it deserved a similar treatment. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part Two is fantastic. Continue reading “REVIEW: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part Two (2011)”

RETRO REVIEW: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part One (2010)

Poster - Warner Bros.
Poster – Warner Bros.

The following is a spoiler-filled retro review of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part One.

In Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part One, Harry Potter (played by Daniel Radcliffe), Ron Weasley (played by Rupert Grint), and Hermione Granger (played by Emma Watson) are unable to return to Hogwarts and, instead, go on the hunt for Horcruxes and ways to destroy them.
Continue reading “RETRO REVIEW: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part One (2010)”

RETRO REVIEW: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007)

Poster - Warner Bros.
Poster – Warner Bros.

The following is a spoiler-filled retro review of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.

With the end of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Warner Bros. and Mike Newell made sure that we were ready to lose people. Cedric Diggory’s death was very sad, but it didn’t come close to being as devastating as what happened in David Yates’ Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Continue reading “RETRO REVIEW: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007)”

RETRO REVIEW: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005)

Poster - Warner Bros.
Poster – Warner Bros.

The following is a spoiler-filled retro review of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.

After Cuarón’s excellent Prisoner of Azkaban, the Mexican film director left the franchise. The next man up, so to speak, was film director Mike Newell – known for Donnie Brasco & Four Weddings and a Funeral. Newell made a surprisingly fun film, considering Goblet of Fire was the first Harry Potter film to be rated PG-13. Continue reading “RETRO REVIEW: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005)”

CLASSIC REVIEW: Schindler’s List (1993)

Theatrical Release poster - Universal Pictures
Theatrical Release poster – Universal Pictures

The following is a classic review of Schindler’s List, a Steven Spielberg film. There are spoilers in this review.

Schindler’s List tells the story of how Oskar Schindler (played by Liam Neeson), a German businessman, saved more than a thousand of Jewish refugees during the Holocaust. This review will be a little bit different. I’ll review this film, by explaining why I didn’t see it until 2016. There are spoilers in this review, so I will not hold anything back.

One of the things I always wondered about, was why my father would never watch Schindler’s List with me. He has always been intrigued by films set during World War II, but for some unknown reason he would never watch it with me. He has always told me that he had seen it, but he has no interest in ever seeing it again. Continue reading “CLASSIC REVIEW: Schindler’s List (1993)”

2 Spin-Off Stories We Need – Dagobah Day #11

Dagobah Day - 2016

Not long ago we got the news that the casting process for young Han Solo was almost done. Rogue One‘s first trailer should be appearing sometime in the next month or so. So, I started to wonder about other possible Star Wars-anthology films that I wanted made. That lead me to today’s post, wherein I pitch two Star Wars stories for Disney to adapt.  Continue reading “2 Spin-Off Stories We Need – Dagobah Day #11”