Best of the 2010s: Top Ten Biographical Pictures

Sometimes biopics — or biographical pictures — get a bad rap. Some people think of them merely as Wikipedia entries on the big screen, others think they just exist for studios to promote during awards season — people like to say that biopics are Oscar-bait. But today I want to showcase my ten favorite biographical pictures of the 2010s. I’ll also preface this list by saying that I reserve the right to change this list for the remainder of 2019 in case something new is good enough to make it onto this list. Continue reading “Best of the 2010s: Top Ten Biographical Pictures”

REVIEW: Steve Jobs (2015)

Theatrical Release Poster – Universal Pictures

The following is a review of Steve Jobs, a Danny Boyle and Aaron Sorkin film.

A couple of years ago, I sat down in a movie theater to watch Joshua Michael Stern’s Jobs, starring Ashton Kutcher. At best, Jobs was an okay film, with a good performance from Ashton Kutcher. Jobs, however, wasn’t memorable at all, and I doubt that I’ll ever see that film again. Tonight I saw Steve Jobs, Aaron Sorkin and Danny Boyle’s take on the late Apple co-founder. I am happy to say that it is much better than Stern’s version. Continue reading “REVIEW: Steve Jobs (2015)”

Top Ten Films of 2015

Top Ten Films 2015

I cannot believe 2015 is coming to an end. It has been the most busy year for my blog yet, and I’m really excited to reveal my top ten films of 2015, some of which really surprised me, and others that somehow were better than expected.

Originally, a couple of films looked missing on this list. This year’s list originally only featured 2015 films that were released in Denmark in 2015, and therefore films like the following 2015 films were not considered for the list: Tom McCarthy’s Spotlight, Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight, A. G. Iñarritu’s The Revenant, Danny Boyle’s Steve Jobs, Todd Haynes’ Carol, and Lenny Abrahamson’s Room.

However, I reconsidered their status after having seen the films above. Spotlight, Brooklyn, and Steve Jobs have pushed The Gift, The Martian, and Beasts of No Nation off the top ten list. I also recently watched Yorgos Lanthimos’ The Lobster, and as a result it has dethroned both The Martian and Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation as the single honorable mention.

One of the things one usually gets hung up on is the idea that the highest rated movie is a critic’s favorite film. I’m not saying it isn’t ever, but that’s not always the case. These films aren’t necessarily ranked on their IJR-score, the top ten is a ranking of my favorite films of the year. Continue reading “Top Ten Films of 2015”

REVIEW: The Martian (2015)

20th Century Fox – Theatrical Release Poster – The Martian

The following is a review of The Martian, a Ridley Scott film.

In 2011, Andy Weir self-published his first ever novel, The Martian. The Martian was envisioned as a very realistic science fiction novel, and it eventually became quite a hit. Then, in 2013, 20th Century Fox optioned the film rights, with Drew Goddard announced as the scriptwriter, and, later, Ridley Scott was announced as the director. One now hoped that Goddard’s talent and Scott’s experience could make The Martian a solid film. Thankfully, it is much more than that – The Martian is one of the best films of 2015. Continue reading “REVIEW: The Martian (2015)”

Review: Dumb and Dumber ‘To’ (2014)


Sometimes sequels just aren’t called for. In the sequel to the 1994 comedy classic, Dumb and Dumber, we follow Lloyd and Harry once again go on a trip across America – this time in search for the daughter of Harry, who has been adopted. There’s some added emotional weight added to the film, seeing as Harry desperately needs to find a kidney-donor.

That’s the overall frame for this feature length journey, and it’s complete with fun nods to the original film like specific dream sequences ending in a certain way, and the vehicle on the film’s poster. Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels are, of course, back – but while they both act out the comedy extremely well, they aren’t given a lot to deal with. I just don’t feel that a huge chunk of this movie is funny at all – primarily around the time of the point of no return in the third act. That’s not to say that it’s not funny at all, because of course Daniels and Carrey are funny – but most of the jokes are not really that memorable – and the film isn’t instantly quotable.

The thing is that the film borrows a lot of the plotpoints and quotes from the original film – and thus takes some fanservice and turns them into wasted moments of material that feels copypasted. Sadly, I also felt that the parts of the plot that weren’t ‘copypasted’ were predictable. Daniels and Carrey are the real highlights of the film, for there’s nothing else to be excited about. The plot feels similar to the original, the jokes feel similar to the ones in the original and the sidecharacters aren’t that exciting.

While I didn’t hate this movie, I feel that I have to add that the people next to me were so disappointed that they left the film after 30 minutes – and I’m sure they weren’t the only ones wishing they were somewhere else… And that’s sad, ’cause it’ll never get old seeing Jeff Daniels and Jim Carrey having fun together.

Overall Score: 4.7 out of 10. Though not completely without laughs or fanservice, this film remains nothing more than yet another comedy classic sequel – and not a single one of them are very good. I loved the original, but this one lost its magic – perhaps this was a missed opportunity.